How will the school support my child and who will explain this to me?

The level of support your child receives will depend on their needs which we know can change over time. It is our aim to be responsive to any developing and emerging needs

  • Many children will have their additional needs met through excellent targeted classroom teaching also known as Quality First Teaching (Universal Support). This means teaching where:
    • the teacher has the highest possible expectations for all pupils
    • teaching is carefully planned to build on to what the child can already do and understand so as to accelerate progress
    • different ways of teaching are put in place so the child is fully involved in learning
    • specific strategies (which may have been suggested by the SENCO or another professional) are put into place to support the child’s learning
  • Some children may take part in specific group work with a smaller group of children. Such groups are put together to address specific gaps that have been identified in a child’s learning and will be closely monitored to ensure that they are resulting in good progress for the child (Targeted Support). These groups may be:
    • run in the classroom or outside the classroom
    • run by a teacher or teaching assistant who has had training to run these groups (usually school staff but sometimes from an approved outside agency which would only be done with a parent’s permission)
  • Some children may have needs that require one to one support (Specialist Support). This support may be:
    • to deliver a specialist package (for example a programme devised by a speech therapist, occupational therapist, physiotherapist)
    • to access certain parts of the curriculum
    • individual teaching programmes to improve literacy or maths skills
    • support with medical/physical needs
    • support to manage social situations and emotional needs

It is at this stage that the child’s name will be officially added to the school’s Special Needs register and more individualised targets put in place through a Pupil Passport or Individual Support Plan.

For children whose needs are severe, complex and lifelong the school (or you) can request that the local Authority carry out a statutory assessment of the child’s needs. This is a legal process you can find out more about by looking at Suffolk’s Local Offer

After a request has been made to the Local Authority they will decide whether they think the child’s needs (as described in the paperwork provided), seem complex enough to need a statutory assessment. If they do they will ask you and all professionals involved with the child to write a report outlining the child’s needs. If they do not think this is necessary, they will ask the school to continue with the support they are providing and may make suggestions as to how this can be further improved.

If they do decide to carry out statutory assessment the reports requested by the Local Authority will be carefully collated and they will write an Education, Health and Care Plan. The Education, Health and Care Plan will outline the support the child will receive from school and any other agencies involved in their care and what strategies must be put in place. It will also have long and short term goals for the child. It will then be regularly reviewed, with you and the child providing input as to how well it is meeting their needs.

Please see flow chart below to help clarify this process.

Answers-4

Year 5 parent

‘Offering my child additional support with maths is helping him massively.’

Reception parent

‘The school have supported my child with an individualised and group learning education to meet his individual learning needs.’

Posted in: SEND FAQs